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Fun facts regarding WalthersProto’s newest name train: Union Pacific’s 1960s City of Los Angeles

1. Faced with ongoing problems with long-time partner, the Chicago and North Western Railway, Union Pacific (UP) shifted its trains to the Milwaukee Road (MILW) in October of 1955. UP insisted all equipment match its own – repainted Milwaukee cars and diesels soon roamed across the UP railroad. Milwaukee soon standardized on the yellow and gray scheme for all of its passenger equipment.

2. EMD E9s were the typical power for the train. Between Chicago and Omaha, both UP and Milwaukee locomotives could be used. From Omaha west, UP locomotives with Automatic Train Stop (ATS) led the train.

3. From the fall of 1956 until 1971, when Amtrak took over, the City of Los Angeles (COLA) with its Pullmans, and the lower priced coach train, Challenger, were combined for the winter months when ridership was declined. Coaches were placed up front, and sleepers at the rear. However, both were still shown as separate named and numbered trains in public timetables.

4. The City of Los Angeles carried a great deal of express and storage mail. In 1953, UP purchased 33 baggage cars from American Car & Foundry, and these cars were often found on the COLA. These long cars were equipped with six-wheel trucks so they could handle heavier loads. All were built to the same plan, but eight had separate roof vents, while 25 had a single large vent (these are the prototype for our model). After 1967 when postal contracts were terminated, most were reassigned to work train service.

5. To reduce the number of stops en route, dining car crews remained on board for the entire trip. They slept in Baggage-Dormitory cars, which were equipped with two- and three-tiers of bunks, along with lavatory and toilet facilities that took up roughly half of the interior, with the remainder used for express or checked baggage.

6. Dome cars were the standard by which all western trains were judged and by 1955 UP offered Dome-Coaches, Dome-Lounges and unique Dome-Diners. While UP had used the name “Streamliner” for its luxury fleet since the 1930s, the competition was so strong that the flagships were rebranded “Domeliners” although the name was actually coined by the Wabash.

7. Dome-Diners were the signature car of the COLA. Like a standard diner, they had a complete kitchen and seating for 36. Eighteen seats were located directly under the dome offering an unequalled dining experience. Competing with Santa Fe’s Super Chief, the lower level included a private dining space with seating for up to 10, known as the “Gold Room,” where special gold-pattern china and gold-plated utensils was used in place of traditional silver.

8. Although constructed as tail cars with an observation end, the added time and costs of switching Dome-Lounge cars at the end of each run led to them being rebuilt for mid-train service in 1956; the end windows were plated and a diaphragm added.

9. Typical of many long-distance trains, Union Pacific provided lower-priced and more informal dining facilities in Café-Lounge cars, first delivered in 1948. As demand for affordable meals increased, UP rebuilt the assigned cars in 1959 with a lunch counter and extra storage space.

10. The Pacific series 10-6 sleepers represented UP’s first order of Budd-built stainless steel cars. Although built of stainless steel with Budd’s signature fluted sides, UP ordered 25 in yellow and gray for the Streamliner fleet, and the remaining 25 in two-tone gray for overnight trains. Yellow and gray was adopted for all passenger cars in 1952, and these distinct and colorful cars were standard equipment on the City of Los Angeles into the 1960s.

11. UP was one of the last roads to order new passenger equipment, with final deliveries in the summer of 1965.

Click to find out more about the WalthersProto HO Scale City of Los Angeles or preorder today (deadline is May 31, 2018).