American Model Builders
Wood Caboose - Kit (Laser-Cut Wood) -- Minneapolis & St Louis #1100 Series w/Cupola

American Model Builders
Wood Caboose - Kit (Laser-Cut Wood) -- Minneapolis & St Louis #1100 Series w/Cupola

Out of Stock
Availability: Ships in 3 Weeks
$49.95
HO
Scale
  • Minneapolis & St Louis (CNW)
  • Walthers Part # 152-882

Product Information

Accurate laser-cut wood constructed caboose body kits ready for detailing. Trucks, couplers, ladders and decals not included. To further enhance these kits, Detail Associates produces an AMB Caboose Detail Kit (#229-550, sold separately) with ladders and pre-bent wire grab irons.
 
Photo shows assembled and painted model - assembly required.
 
In the late 1930s, the Minneapolis & St. Louis received nine used 95000 series cabooses from the Lehigh Valley - these were first steel underframe crummies on this Midwest road. After complete rebuilding at their Iowa Central Shops into full-width cupola style cars, the M&StL renumbered their new 32' wood sheathed cars #1100-08. In 1940, these cabooses served as patterns to build twelve nearly identical cars, numbered 1109-20. The entire series was used extensively on the system and several were still in service when the Chicago & North Western took over in 1960.
 
Working closing with original drawings and information from the Chicago & North Western Historical Society, this kit builds into a striking replica of the prototype. The 100% laser-cut kit features Tab & Slotted basswood subwalls and Peel & Stick, custom scribed siding, doors, windows, and trim. An accurate detailed underframe and cast resin steps are included, along with delicate, laser-cut brake wheels, ladders and end railings. The kit is finished off with a white metal smoke jack, and brass wire is included for bending your own hand holds utilizing the printed templates. Couplers, decals, and trucks not included, but suggested brands and part numbers are listed in the instructions along with painting tips and an illustrated history of the prototype written by M&StL historian Gene Green.